Struggle with meal planning?

Subscribe to download the guide to learn how to more effectively meal plan!

    We respect your privacy. Unsubscribe at any time.

    Struggling with meal planning?

    Subscribe to download the guide and learn how to more effectively meal plan to reduce food waste and save money!

      We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time.

      Creamy Gochujang Pasta (Easy Recipe)

      This Korean-inspired pasta recipe has a creamy sauce with a hint of sweetness and spiciness. It’s an easy recipe and takes less than twenty minutes to make, which makes this creamy gochujang pasta a great weeknight dinner option.

      gochujang pasta

      What is gochujang?

      Gochujang is a fermented Korean chili paste that is used commonly in Korean cuisine. It primarily consists of glutinous rice, fermented soybeans, chili peppers and salt. 

      It has a beautiful red hue and a salty, spicy and umami flavor that works great in a variety of savory sauces and dishes. 

      Origins

      Gochujang has been a part of Korean cooking for thousands of years. It is unique to Korea, similar to another iconic fermented food, kimchi. 

      It’s long been seen as a health food in Korea, especially helpful for those who are sick. Gochujang was also thought to improve digestive functionality. 

      Recipes

      Gochujang is used in a variety of Korean dishes, both traditional and new. Some of these dishes include bibimbap (mixed rice and vegetable dish), tteokbokki (spicy rice cakes), kimchi (fermented spicy cabbage), dak-galbi (spicy chicken) and jjigae (kimchi stew).

      Where to buy

      You can find gochujang at most Asian markets or Asian grocery stores. It typically comes in a red rectangular package with a removable lid. 

      Some regular grocery stores may carry gochujang, as it’s become more popular over the last few years. Even Trader Joe’s has its own gochujang and gochujang sauce!

      gochujang pasta

      Ingredients for Gochujang Pasta

      The ingredients for this creamy gochujang pasta are listed below along with all of the possible alternatives you can use. For the best results, I wouldn’t recommend making any substitutions. 

      IngredientsSubstitutions
      Whole wheat pasta, any shapeWhite pasta, white rice pasta, brown rice pasta, udon noodles, ramen noodles, any other types of pasta
      Olive oilAvocado oil, canola oil, sunflower oil, vegetable oil
      Yellow onionWhite onion, sweet onion, red onion, shallot
      Garlic clovesJar minced garlic, garlic powder
      White mushroomsShiitake mushrooms, button mushrooms
      Salt and pepperKosher salt, sea salt
      Gochujang paste
      MilkOat milk, almond milk, heavy cream, half and half
      Brown sugarWhite sugar, honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar
      Baby spinachKale, collard greens, chard
      ParmesanAny kind of cheese
      Green onions (optional)Chives

      How to make Gochujang Pasta

      First, follow the package instructions to prepare your whole wheat pasta al dente. Drain and set aside.

      In a large skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil. Once hot, add the diced onion, minced garlic and chopped mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. Saute until the onions are browned and mushrooms have shrunk.

      Add the gochujang paste to the skillet, mix, then add the brown sugar and milk. Stir until the gochujang is dissolved. Add the chopped baby spinach and fold into the sauce until wilted. 

      Add the cooked pasta and parmesan to the gochujang pasta sauce and toss together. Continue to cook until the sauce has thickened. Serve with extra parmesan cheese, green onions and your favorite protein if desired. Enjoy!

      How to store for later

      If you have any leftovers, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. It should last about 2-3 days before it spoils. To reheat, transfer to a microwave safe bowl and heat for 1 minute, then 30 seconds intervals until warm.

      After you prepare your creamy gochujang pasta, make sure you aren’t leaving the dish out for more than two hours before transferring to the refrigerator. Any leftovers left at room temperature for longer than two hours should be tossed due to increased risk of foodborne illness. 

      gochujang pasta

      Additional Tips

      I wouldn’t recommend using spaghetti shaped pasta or any long, thin noodles for this recipe. If that’s all you have on hand it’s fine of course, but I find the vegetables all gather at the edges of the pan if you use long pasta shapes. I prefer them to all be mixed in nicely. 

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Is gochujang very spicy?

      The Korean fermented chili paste is spicy, but it doesn’t pack that much heat compared to other hot sauces. That being said, it depends on how much you consume. It rates less than 1,000 Scoville units, which is fairly mild compared to hot peppers like jalapeño.  

      Is gochujang similar to sriracha?

      Gochujang is similar to sriracha due to it being spicy and part of Asian cuisine. But the two foods are different in many ways. Gochujang comes from Korea and is a thick, red fermented paste. Sriracha is used in Thai and Vietnamese cuisine and is less thick and more spicy compared to gochujang. 

      What is the closest sauce to gochujang?

      If you are looking for a substitute for gochujang, you can try ssamjang, doenjang, sambal oelek, miso paste, chili garlic sauce or sriracha. While none of these are perfect substitutes, they can work in a pinch to mimic the taste and spiciness of gochujang. 

      Is gochujang healthy for you?

      Gochujang can be part of a healthy diet. The fermentation process gochujang goes through means it’s high in probiotics, which can be beneficial for your gut health. That being said, it’s high in sodium which can be harmful if consumed in excess. To sum it up, gochujang should be consumed in moderation for the most benefits. 

      If you tried this recipe and liked it, I’d love to hear your thoughts and see the final product! Rate this recipe and comment down below. Also, don’t forget to tag me on social media @tasteitwithtia!

      gochujang pasta

      Creamy Gochujang Pasta

      This pasta is the perfect mix of spicy, sweet and savory! It's easy to make and filled with fiber and vegetables!
      Prep Time 5 minutes
      Cook Time 9 minutes
      Total Time 17 minutes
      Course Main Course
      Cuisine Italian, korean
      Servings 2 servings

      Ingredients
        

      • 1.5 cups dry whole wheat pasta any shape
      • 1 tbsp olive oil
      • 1/2 yellow onion diced
      • 1 cup white mushrooms sliced
      • 4 cloves garlic minced
      • 1 tbsp gochujang
      • salt and pepper to taste
      • 1 cup milk of choice
      • 1 tsp brown sugar
      • 2 cups baby spinach chopped
      • 1/4 cup parmesan cheese

      Instructions
       

      • First, follow the package instructions to prepare your whole wheat pasta al dente. Drain and set aside.
      • In a large skillet over medium heat, add the olive oil. Once hot, add the diced onion, minced garlic and chopped mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. Saute until the onions are browned and mushrooms have shrunk.
      • Add the gochujang paste to the skillet, mix, then add the brown sugar and milk. Stir until the gochujang is dissolved. Add the chopped baby spinach and fold into the sauce until wilted.
      • Add the cooked pasta and parmesan to the gochujang pasta sauce and toss together. Continue to cook until the sauce has thickened.
      • Serve with extra parmesan cheese, green onions and your favorite protein if desired. Enjoy!

      Share this article on your social media:

      RECENT BLOG POSTS

      How helpful was this article? Leave a comment down below to let me know! I appreciate good feedback so I can improve my content in the future.

      Leave a Comment

      Recipe Rating




      Search

      ABOUT ME

      tia glover rd

      My name is Tia and I am a registered dietitian and content creator.

      My goal is to help young people learn how to eat a nutritious, balanced diet without restriction or giving up cultural foods. 💛

      Hapa/Japanese American 🇺🇸🇯🇵

      Get notified 📧 when I post a new article/recipe:

      RECENT RECIPES

      BLOG POSTS